Release Date: September 22, 2006
Studio: Paramount Pictures
Director: Jeff Tremaine
Screenwriter: Sean Cliver, Preston Lacy
Starring: Johnny Knoxville, Bam Margera, Ryan Dunn, Steve-O, Jason “Wee Man” Acuña, Chris Pontius, Preston Lacy, Dave England, Ehren McGhehey
Genre: Comedy
MPAA Rating: R (for extremely crude and dangerous stunts throughout, sexual content, nudity and language)

Plot Summary: After smearing the world with all sorts of ridiculous crap, the original creators and cast of the MTV series “jackass” and “jackass the movie” go one louder in “jackass: number two.” Significantly raising the stakes and lowering the bar, “jackass: number two” unleashes a spirited mess of absurdity as the cast and crew gets even more ugly around the globe.

Review:

laughs over politics
people want laughs not politics

At the age of 18, JOHNNY KNOXVILLE moved his hillbilly ass out to California from his native Tennessee to pursue a career in acting. He supported himself by appearing in commercials and freelance writing jobs. In 1998, Knoxville teamed up with Jeff Tremaine of Big Brother, and the two went on to create and produce the cultural blight forever known as “jackass.”

From the notoriety and success of the MTV series “jackass” and feature film of the same name, Knoxville finally graduated to a series of big screen roles. He recently starred as Luke Duke in “The Dukes of Hazzard” and appeared in “Daltry Calhoun,” “Lords of Dogtown,” and “The Ringer.”

When “jackass the movie” was released in 2002, people were outraged. Critics called it “a new low,” “a plunge into depravity,” “a sad commentary on our degenerating culture,” and “a disgusting, repulsive, grotesque spectacle.” Unfortunately for them, here comes “jackass number two.”

When “jackass number 2” was released it opened at #1. It out performed “All The King’s Men” which had an all star cast. Could it be, at the time of it’s release, people wanted laughs not politics? Like duh!

If politics is the circus, then jackass represents the clowns
When the politicians complain that TV turns the proceedings into a circus, it should be made clear that the circus was already there, and that TV has merely demonstrated that not all the performers are well trained.
–Edward R. Murrow

THE IMPORTANCE OF LAUGHTER
Think of what would happen to us in America if there were no humorists; life would be one long Congressional Record.
— Tom Masson
Total absence of humor renders life impossible.
— Colette

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